Anthropology Club makes a comeback on campus

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When Delta College students think of joining the campus Anthropology club, the first thing that may come to mind is bones and primates, but the club can offer much more than that.

Alex Coburn, a current Delta student recently re-founded the club. He said it offers a chance to “help students get their foot through the door in research.”

The idea to start the club came about this semester.

It’s “all students driven, fun and educational,” said Dr. Peggy Scully-Linder, the club’s advisor and physical anthropology instructor.

“I think it’s a great idea since this a commuting campus,” said Scully, “Instead of just getting in your car and driving home right after class, students can join our little community.”

Coburn, president of the current club, got his interest in anthropology in adolescence.

“I’ve wanted to go into anthropology since I was six-years old,” he said. “My mom gave me a book about archaeology and that’s when I realized someone would pay me for digging in the dirt.”

Coburn is also a volunteer at Micke Grove Park and Zoo in Lodi, which is the club’s next planned trip.

“I teach people about the animals, primarily primates,” said Coburn.

The club held a Titanic Tea Party event in Danner Hall on April 15.

The event offered students to take a look at Titanic memorabilia and partake in tea, crumpets and scones.

This event is among others the club has had, including: an Oak Grove park and museum trip, nature walks and a St. Patrick’s Day cookie sale, where club members educated passersby about the history of the holiday.

The club plans to also have a detailed tour of Julia’s House, a Stockton historical landmark.

Since the club started mid semester, the members haven’t had many resources for trip plans.

“When we get a better start next year our fundraisers will be more numerous and allow us to take more extravagant trips,” said Scully-Linder.

The club meets Tuesdays in Holt 125 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and also on Wednesdays in the Rauhuff board room in Shima from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Scully-Linder encourages students to join and learn about different studies of anthropology.

“I’m always there for the students or at least I try to be as much as I can, it’s my job,” said Scully-Linder.