Students offline and disconnected

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wifiMany students have noticed the lack of cell service and a Wi-Fi connection on campus.

At first, I thought it was just me who couldn’t figure out how to log on to the school’s network.

I am not tech-savvy in the slightest. I thought the phone service I had was just uncooperative with the campus network.

Then I began to hear people talking about how they couldn’t receive service either, so I questioned them about their experiences.

Most of them have different phone carriers than I do and have various problems, which I do not.

My biggest problem is not being able to receive or send text messages, not being able to use Wi-Fi and my phone calls dropping on campus.

Other students are unable to make or receive phone calls at all.

This is dangerous to students, especially in a case of emergency.

We have programs set up through e-mail, text message or applications, such as TipSoft, yet we would have no way to access them until we leave campus.

Who does this benefit? No one.

Some text alerts inform students of crimes committed in certain buildings or stairwells.

Let’s just say a student had no service on his cell phone and couldn’t receive this alert. He could very possibly enter into the building or stairwell and get into a lot of trouble.

This is a made up scenario, but it could happen to any one of us, any day.

I wouldn’t want anyone being put into that situation, just as I would not want to be put into that situation myself.

I am signed up for these alerts but due to my terrible cell phone reception, I might not be aware of a situation before I walk into it.

As for Wi-Fi, I do think it is necessary for two reasons.

First, the TipSoft app doesn’t work without Wi-Fi, and is part of the danger listed above.

Second, if Wi-Fi worked for me on campus, I could do so much more.

I wouldn’t have to rely on the hope that a computer is open in the library.

Most days there are one or two available, but sometimes they are all booked.

If the campus Wi-Fi existed as it did a few years ago, I could bring my own laptop and fire through all of my work anywhere on campus.

I could also keep up with the news online if Wi-Fi worked properly.

My major is journalism, and it is crucial that I am constantly informed with what is going on around the world.

Without the Wi-Fi, I am left itching for information until I get home. Even then, I have to go to Starbucks because I have no Wi-Fi at my house.

Some students often think, because of my struggle with technology, that I just don’t know how to use the Wi-Fi at school.

Rest assured, ladies and gentlemen, I have consulted librarians three different times, and had many failed attempts on my own time.

I am not alone in this struggle. I share your pain, fellow Delta College students.

Together, we shall unite to correct what is wrong. If no one will do anything, we will continue to struggle.rkey