Elevators to see fixes in 2014

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DOORS OPEN: The elevators across campus will be renovated beginning in the spring. PHOTO BY CHRIS HOWZE

The elevators on campus will see renovations beginning in the spring thanks to $800,000 of board approved Measure L bond funds.

The money was approved during a September special board meeting in which Director of Facilities Management Michael Garr gave a presentation on bond projects to be completed.

Campus elevators breakdowns have long been a source of strife for students, staff and those with mobility issues. This semester alone, the elevators have broken down numerous times.

Delta College has an elevator service company on retainer for issues or to help people get out if the elevator stalls.

“Only one person last semester was trapped, and only for under an hour,” Garr said.

A “rash number of outages” have made fixes a high priority.

The work includes renovating the existing elevators.

“Basically keeping the shell of the elevator, everything else fixed. Complete Renovation,” Garr said. Garr said the renovations also include replacing lighting, panels, floors and buttons. The result will look like a new elevator.

Garr also said the electrical components and load sensors will be replaced.

DOORS OPEN: The elevators across campus will be renovated beginning in the spring. PHOTO BY CHRIS HOWZE
DOORS OPEN: The elevators across campus will be renovated beginning in the spring. PHOTO BY CHRIS HOWZE

“The new equipment will be more durable,” said Mark Showers, manager of maintenance and energy at the college, adding that components will also be protected.

Both passenger elevators and the cargo elevators will see the upgrades. Only components will be renovated in the cargo elevators.

Garr and Showers said the elevators are tested, and can carry up to 3,000 pounds. Mobility devices are not what contribute to the outages. It’s more heavy usage all day, every day. The Shima elevator is one of the most trafficked.

Garr said the college currently has a contractor analyzing the elevators.

“One elevator at a time,” he said.

Garr also said there are plans to use cargo elevators in buildings where passenger elevators are out of order, to help students up to classes.

There are also plans to relocate classes to benefit students and staff with disabilities.