GETTING A SUMMER JOB: Making yourself marketable during the hot-month job hunt

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It’s that time of year, when college students are gearing up for the summer break from school. The problem young people frequently run into, though, is a lack of spending money to do fun things.
So the other activity students are gearing up for is finding a summer job.
Summer jobs can be exciting and profitable, but in order to obtain one, you must get through the interview process and get hired.
Here are some good tips from someone who just finished doing mock interviews for Lincoln High School.

1) SMILE

It’s a no brainer or so you would think.

But in the mock interviews I have done for high school students, I was shocked at the amount of them who didn’t smile at me once.
Smiling shows that you are, indeed, a human being that is going to be easy to get along with.

2) RELAX

It will show if you are tense, trust me.

I know it’s important. I know it’s scary. I know it’s nerve racking.  You must relax. It will help.

3) HAVE A FIRM HANDSHAKE

No one will hire a man (or woman!) with a wet floppy fish handshake.  You won’t believe the impression it leaves.

Try using a firm grip, lasting one to two full seconds.
It communicates sincerity.

4) HAVE A RESUME

Put anything and everything you have on there.

High school diploma, currently attending Delta College, your major, mowing lawns over summer, previous summer jobs and babysitting your neighbor’s children are all excellent examples of experience to put on the resume.
Even if you have never had a “real” job, a resume is a must
Bring a copy of your resume to the interview-the interviewer may not have a copy!  Also bring your personal and professional references written down in case you are asked for them.
It communicates preparedness.
5) DON’T SELL YOURSELF SHORT
This is the time to put your strengths on the table.
If you get along well with the public, say it.
You can use Microsoft Excel? Bring it up in conversation.
You are fluent in English and Spanish? Make sure to bring that up.
Remember the job you are applying for and play up those strengths.
Never ever say you are “kind of lazy” or a “procrastinator.” That’s a Kiss of Death.  Yes, someone actually said that to me in an interview.

6) DRESSED TO IMPRESS

Sounds simple right? You would be surprised at how many people go into interviews in their street clothes.

Obviously if it’s a summer job, you’re not interviewing to be a partner at a law firm, so a four-piece $400 suit is not necessary.
But a button down, neutral colored shirt, a pair of black slacks, and a matching tie are not hard-to-come-by items.
Simply walking in to ask for an application; you should be wearing these clothes as well.
7) BE APPRECIATIVE, SAY THANK YOU
Thank the interviewer for his or her time (using the person’s name).
It seems as if something everyone already does, but once again, you would be surprised.
I’m not personally a fan of thank you notes. I prefer a phone call, which leads to my last bit of advice.

8) FOLLOW UP

If you haven’t heard anything in a week, call back.

Call, call, call.

Not every day, but once or twice a week until you get an answer is appropriate.

“The squeaky wheel gets the oil,” is an old adage for a reason.

An interviewer would rather receive a phone call from someone who is genuinely interested in the job than a simple thank you note.