Shakespeare returns ‘Guerrilla’ style

80
0
SHARE

Last Tuesday, the day to day routine of traveling from one class to another

across Delta College’s Quad was interrupted.

Jeanne Malilay and Matt Rust perform a very intense rendition of the “Get Thee to a Nunnery” scene from “Hamlet.”
Jeanne Malilay and Matt Rust perform a very intense rendition of the “Get Thee to a Nunnery” scene from “Hamlet.”

Interrupted by people in lavish outfits yelling out in iambic pentameter.

Delta’s Theater department brought back Guerrilla Shakespeare, the last time being in 2011.

This years performances titled “Will Power” had actors rushing out and performing scenes from some of William Shakespeare’s most famous plays.

Key scenes from “Romeo and Juliet,” “Hamlet,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Twelfth Night” and “As You Like It,” brought humor, physicality and at times very loud pronounced shouting to just outside the Goleman library.

Ariel Armanino and Artemio Angel share a playfull scene as Phoebe and Silvius from the comedy “As You Like It.”
Ariel Armanino and Artemio Angel share a playfull scene as Phoebe and Silvius from the comedy “As You Like It.”

Ariel Armanino, who played Phoebe in a fun and flirty scene from “As You Like it,” explained that before performing live in front of an unsuspecting crowd, that they practice and have a run through of every piece the weeks leading up to showtime, in the studio theater.

Which is a good thing because the 12:30 to 1 p.m. presentation in the afternoon was interrupted by maintenance trucks, passing student sporting confused faces and at one point a ride on lawn mower, which according to English professor Paula Sheil, who helped organize the performances, struck to the purpose of such a practice.

The most physical and humorous scene was from “Twelfth Night” as Rhonda Allen’s Fabian and Chad Sommerville’s Sir Toby set up Eric Grant’s Sir Andrew Aguecheek  to a challenge of the sword.
The most physical and humorous scene was from “Twelfth Night” as Rhonda Allen’s Fabian and Chad Sommerville’s Sir Toby set up Eric Grant’s Sir Andrew Aguecheek to a challenge of the sword.

The actors had to continue their scenes, adapting to the changes to their environment and not skipping a beat.

Challenges like this will allow the actors to have the focus even with distractions.

Harvey Jordan, the theater director, works on changing his challenges to the class every semester.