Physics Club showcases wonders of science

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On Feb. 27, the Delta College Physics Club held a Physics Science show in lower Danner Hall.

The relatively new club, only going back to last semester, aims to build more demos and host more shows in the future to garner members.
“Last semester we didn’t do any shows so this is the first year. We just started and it’s really kinda coming together. That was the first demo that we actually built. We plan on doing a bunch more too, and not just here other places,” said Physics Club Secretary Ethan Robertson.
The show drew a respectable crowd in that filled majority of lower Danner Hall.

Many stayed engaged throughout the show and applauded enthusiastically. The demos included the standing wave demonstration, a projectile launcher, conservation of angular momentum, the bicycle gyroscope, the Brachistochrone curve and the hand-held Tesla coil.
The standing wave demonstration included a Chladni plate or a square metal plate that vibrates and it showcased how particles can be waves.
The projectile launcher allowed for the audience to participate by suggesting an angle at which the ball could be launched so it’d land in an empty trash can. When a ball finally landed in the container, the audience applauded as if we were at an NBA game and an overall sense of satisfaction blanketed the room.
The conservation of angular momentum included a volunteer from the audience to stand on a spinning chair holding a spinning tire and when they tilted the tire to the left or right, their whole body would turn in that direction. The science behind this made the volunteer look like he had superpowers or was a magician in another life.
“I learned about the experiments and the demos, and I’d liked to be in the summer class for Physics,” said Delta student Luis Fernando Chavez after watching the show.
Pizza, snacks and drinks were offered to students afterwards  for $5 for students without a Mustang Pass and free for those with one.
“What I enjoy most [about the club] is I like having a club where people are able to explore physics because in reality physics are everywhere… and I would like to let people become more aware of that,” said Physics Club President Dolly Nguyen.
The club plans on putting on more shows at Delta and through community outreach programs at low-income schools so it can inspire more students to join the STEM field.

The club is also going to be participating in Dia de Ciencias at University of the Pacific with it Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers where it will be a part of two rotations to perform a 20-minute demo.
To find out more information about the Physics Club, stop by one of the meetings every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in SCMA 112.

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On Feb. 27, the Delta College Physics Club held a Physics Science show in lower Danner Hall.

The relatively new club, only going back to last semester, aims to build more demos and host more shows in the future to garner members.
“Last semester we didn’t do any shows so this is the first year. We just started and it’s really kinda coming together. That was the first demo that we actually built. We plan on doing a bunch more too, and not just here other places,” said Physics Club Secretary Ethan Robertson.
The show drew a respectable crowd in that filled majority of lower Danner Hall.

Many stayed engaged throughout the show and applauded enthusiastically. The demos included the standing wave demonstration, a projectile launcher, conservation of angular momentum, the bicycle gyroscope, the Brachistochrone curve and the hand-held Tesla coil.
The standing wave demonstration included a Chladni plate or a square metal plate that vibrates and it showcased how particles can be waves.
The projectile launcher allowed for the audience to participate by suggesting an angle at which the ball could be launched so it’d land in an empty trash can. When a ball finally landed in the container, the audience applauded as if we were at the NBA’s and an overall sense of satisfaction blanketed the room.
The conservation of angular momentum included a volunteer from the audience to stand on a spinning chair holding a spinning tire and when they tilted the tire to the left or right, their whole body would turn in that direction. The science behind this made the volunteer look like he had superpowers or was a magician in another life.
“I learned about the experiments and the demos, and I’d liked to be in the summer class for Physics,” said Delta student Luis Fernando Chavez after watching the show.
Pizza, snacks and drinks were offered to students afterwards  for $5 for students without a Mustang Pass and free for those with one.
“What I enjoy most [about the club] is I like having a club where people are able to explore physics because in reality physics are everywhere… and I would like to let people become more aware of that,” said Physics Club President Dolly Nguyen.
The club plans on putting on more shows at Delta and through community outreach programs at low-income schools so it can inspire more students to join the STEM field.

The club is also going to be participating in Dia de Ciencias at University of the Pacific with UOP’s Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers where it will be a part of two rotations to perform a 20-minute demo.
To find out more information about the Physics Club, stop by one of the meetings every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. in SCMA 112.